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Research Guides

ENGL 203 Writing about Literature-Protest & Critique-Prof. Dr. Jackson (Spring 2021)

Welcome

This guide will introduce you to some of the best library and web resources for this course. 
For further assistance contact Rebecca Hankins

Books of Interest

Discourse on Colonialism

This classic work, first published in France in 1955, profoundly influenced the generation of scholars and activists at the forefront of liberation struggles in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Nearly twenty years later, when published for the first time in English, Discourse on Colonialism inspired a new generation engaged in the Civil Rights, Black Power, and anti-war movements and has sold more than 75,000 copies to date. Aimé Césaire eloquently describes the brutal impact of capitalism and colonialism on both the colonizer and colonized, exposing the contradictions and hypocrisy implicit in western notions of "progress"and "civilization" upon encountering the "savage," "uncultured," or"primitive." 

A Small Place

This expansive essay shows us -- in a delighfully Swiftian mode -- what we have not yet seen of Antigua, the small island in the British West Indies where Kincaid grew up.

A Raisin in the Sun

Lorraine Hansberry's award-winning drama about the hopes and aspirations of a struggling, working-class family living on the South Side of Chicago connected profoundly with the psyche of black America--and changed American theater forever. The play's title comes from a line in Langston Hughes's poem "Harlem," which warns that a dream deferred might "dry up/like a raisin in the sun." 

From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor's searching examination of the social, political and economic dimensions of the prevailing racial order offers important context for understanding the necessity of the emerging movement for black liberation."

Mixed Company

The plays in this collection each look back at Jamaica's pre-independence days, and each has a distinguished place in the history of Jamaican theatre. Each of these previously unpublished plays is accompanied by an introduction from their trailblazing authors. Includes: Maskarade by Sylvia Wynter, Bedward by Louis Marriott and The Creatures by Cecily Waite Smith.

The Hills of Hebron

Written in the late 1950s on the cusp of Jamaica's independence from Britain, The Hills of Hebron tells the story of a group of formerly enslaved Jamaicans as they attempt to create a new life and assert themselves against the colonial power. Based on the early twentieth century Bedwardism movement (a revivalist group led by Alexander Bedward), The Hills of Hebron, was one of the first attempts to present the lives of black Jamaicans not as colonial subjects, but as independent human beings. " "

Gandhi

Hind Swaraj is Mahatma Gandhi's fundamental work. It is a key to understanding not only his life and thought but also the politics of South Asia in the first half of the twentieth century. For the first time this volume presents the 1910 text of Hind Swaraj and includes Gandhi's own Preface and Foreword (not found in other editions) and annotations by the editor.

Nature Poem

A book-length poem about how an American Indian writer can't bring himself to write about nature but is forced to reckon with colonial-white stereotypes, manifest destiny, and his own identity as a young, queer, urban-dwelling poet. A Best Book of the Year at BuzzFeed, Interview, and more.   Nature Poem follows Teebs--a young, queer, American Indian (or NDN) poet--who can't bring himself to write a nature poem. 

Savage Conversations

Savage Conversations is a daring account of a former first lady and the ghosts that tormented her for the contradictions and crimes on which this nation is founded.