Skip to main content

Research Guides

HIST/WGST 461.500: The History of American Women (Fall 2020)

Welcome

Books of Interest

Jayne Cortez, Adrienne Rich, and the Feminist Superhero

This book reconsiders the poetry activism of Jayne Cortez and Adrienne Rich side-by-side, engaging poetics theory, cultural studies, and popular media in its literary analyses.

The Feminine Mystique

The Feminine Mystique (1963) is a powerful critique of women's roles in contemporary American society. Drawing on new scholarship in the social sciences, Betty Friedan attacked a wide range of institutions--among them women's magazines, women's colleges, and advertisers--for promoting a one-dimensional image of women as happy housewives. This image, Friedan suggested, created a "feminine mystique," a belief that "fulfillment as a woman had only one definition for American women after 1949--the housewife-mother." 

Feminists Who Changed America, 1963-1975

Documenting key feminists who ignited the second wave women's movement   Barbara J. Love's Feminists Who Changed America, 1963-1975 will be the first comprehensive directory to document many of the founders and leaders (including both well-known and grassroots organizers) of the second wave women's movement.  It tells the stories of more than two thousand individual women and a few notable men who together reignited the women's movement and made permanent changes to entrenched customs and laws.   

Women of Empire

Verity McInnis reveals in this comparative study of two female populations in two global locations. Women of Empire adds a previously unexplored dimension to our understanding of the connections between gender and imperialism in the nineteenth century. McInnis examines the intersections of class, race, and gender to reveal social spaces where female identity and power were both contested and constructed.

Queer Bergman by Prof. Daniel Humphrey

Daniel Humphrey brings into focus Ingmar Bergman's radical denunciation of heteronormative values, his savage and darkly humorous deconstructions of gender roles, and his work's trenchant, if also deeply conflicted, attacks on homophobically constructed forms of patriarchic authority. 

Liberation Theology in Chicana/O Literature

Liberation Theology in Chicana/o Literature looks at the ways in which Chicana/o authors who have experienced cultural disconnection or marginalization because of their gender, gender politics and sexual orientation attempt to forge a connection back to Chicana/o culture through their use of liberation theology.

Separate Roads to Feminism

This examines the emergence of feminist movements from the Civil Rights/Black Liberation movement, the Chicano movement, and the white left in the 1960s and 1970s. The author argues that the 'second wave' was comprised of feminisms: organizationally distinct movements that influenced each other in complex ways. 

Ar'n't I a Woman?

Living with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society. This new edition of Ar'n't I a Woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. 

New Black Feminist Criticism, 1985-2000

A passionate and celebrated pioneer in her own words New Black Feminist Criticism, 1985-2000 collects a selection of essays and reviews from Barbara Christian, one of the founding voices in black feminist literary criticism. Published between the release of her second landmark book Black Feminist Criticism and her death, these writings include eloquent reviews, evaluations of black feminist criticism as a discipline, reflections on black feminism in the academy, and essays on Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Paule Marshall, and others.

Career Moves: Mentoring for Women Advancing their Career and Leadership in Academia

Mentoring and career guidance are the missing ingredients in women's career planning at the higher education level. This book recognizes and gives voice to some of the common career concerns of women in higher education and responds to these through well informed, researched and experiential chapters focusing on interests specific to women in academia.

Reading Black, Reading Feminist

A unique and comprehensive collection of 26 literary essays that provides real evidence of the rich cultural history of black women in America.   Black women's writing has finally emerged as one of the most dynamic fields of American literature. Here, leading literary critics--both male and female, black and white--look at fiction, nonfiction, poetry, slave narratives, and autobiographies in a totally new way. 

Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

An accessible one-volume encyclopedia, this addition to the Literary Movements series is a comprehensive reference guide to the history and development of feminist literature, from early fairy tales to works by great women writers of today. 

Women's Suffrage

Discusses the history of women's voting rights, how women campaigned for full voting rights across the country, and how their efforts led to gains in equality for women in other areas as well.

Levinas, Judaism, and the Feminine

Challenging previous interpretations of Levinas that gloss over his use of the feminine or show how he overlooks questions raised by feminists, Claire Elise Katz explores the powerful and productive links between the feminine and religion in Levinas's work. Rather than viewing the feminine as a metaphor with no significance for women or as a means to reinforce traditional stereotypes, Katz goes beyond questions of sexual difference to reach a more profound understanding of the role of the feminine in Levinas's conception of ethical responsibility. 

Through Women's Eyes

Through Women’s Eyes: An American History was the first textbook in U.S. women’s history to present an inclusive narrative within the context of the central developments of U.S. history and to integrate written and visual primary sources into each chapter. The result, according to authors Ellen Carol DuBois and Lynn Dumenil, was to "reveal the relationship between secondary and original sources, to show history as a dynamic process of investigation and interpretation rather than a set body of facts and figures."